Casio Inc. PX150 WH 88-Key Digital Stage Piano

Casio Inc. PX150 WH 88-Key Digital Stage Piano (2012 MODEL)

  • Tri-Sensor, Scaled Hammer-Action Keyboard
  • 4 Layer Stereo Piano
  • Ebony and Ivory Feel Keys
  • Hammer Response and Damper Resonance Simulator
  • White Finish
The PX-150 represents a significant step in the continuing evolution of the Privia digital piano line. A combination of a new keyboard action and a powerful new sound engine provide a new level of detail, nuance and expression for a superior grand piano experience in the lightweight and stylish design that Privia is known for.Piano SoundThe award winning grand piano sound in Privia has been dramatically improved. The new PX-150 utilizes more than three times the memory of the previous generation for a more natural piano tone. In addition, Casio s new proprietary sound source AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator) provides unmatched realism and detail. This engine provides seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performa

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3 thoughts on “Casio Inc. PX150 WH 88-Key Digital Stage Piano

  1. T.D.
    104 of 107 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    First Experience with a Casio Keyboard, December 5, 2012
    By 
    T.D.

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    Let me start by saying that I picked this up primarily to use for silent practice. I am an adult taking lessons and have a Yamaha acoustic piano that I love. I wanted something that I could use without disturbing the rest of the family (or driving them crazy listening to the same piece a hundred times over). I’m not using any of the interface functions as of yet (and probably won’t). I had picked up the Yamaha DGX-530 initially, but discovered a defect in the keyboard so returned it. I wasn’t pleased with the “lightly weighted” keys of the DGX-530 (though all of the voices were fun to play with), so decided its replacement needed a more piano like action.

    This Casio has a heavier touch than my Yamaha acoustic does, but makes it easier to transition between the acoustic and the Casio than the DGX-530 would have. It does have a few voices (eighteen I believe, some of which are piano variations) and the ability to do some dual voices with the strings, but again, my desire for this was primarily for silent (or at least quiet) practice. The speakers in the Casio are average, I tend to start out with the speakers but transition to headphones if I’m going to sit for any length of time, the sound coming thru headphones just sound nicer. I get some noise from the keys, but it is more thuddy than clicky. I am impressed with how the keyboard mimics the audio nuances of a piano, acting very much like an acoustic when you manipulate the keys with different pressures, quite realistic. The texturing of the keys is nicer than your typical digital keyboard (at least in this price range). The power adapter and a cheaper style sustain pedal are included. I picked up a Stagg KXS-A6 X style stand for it that works nicely, but be aware that the PX150 seems to be a thicker unit, as it sits a little higher on this stand than I’d like when sitting (and I’m a little over 6′ tall, so that stand probably wouldn’t be a good one for kids).

    Overall I’m very pleased with the build quality and realism of the PX150. A better speaker system would be nice, but is an acceptable trade off for me given the other features and price. The PX150 has been a great unit for the purpose I was searching for!

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  2. Laurence H. Levin "Beakybird"
    76 of 81 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An amazing piece of technology, March 10, 2013
    By 
    Laurence H. Levin “Beakybird” (Woodridge, IL USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    I’m a professional keyboardist but not a pro piano player.

    OK. This keyboard doesn’t have any of the bells and whistles of the higher model Privias and Celviano digital pianos. It doesn’t have an LED screen. It only has 18 voices. It doesn’t have line outs. It doesn’t have lines in. It doesn’t have a USB flash drive input. It comes with cheap speakers.

    But this keyboard has the same key bed and the same sound engine for its concert grand piano that the higher models have. So through headphones or through a stereo system, the PX-150 will sound just as good as Casio’s highest model.

    And let me tell you, this keyboard has a fantastic set of keys and a superb grand piano.

    The keys are made to feel like ivory and ebony keys. They have a light grain to them. They feel like expensive piano keys, not like plastic keyboard keys. The keys are progressively heavier and slower as you go down and lighter and faster as you go up the scale like a real grand piano. The keyboard has wonderful resonance. On a real piano, if you play three notes with the damper pedal pressed, you will hear the sympathetic vibration of the strings that aren’t being played. Casio has modeled this effect. A typical MIDI keyboard will transmit 127 different levels of velocity depending on how it’s played. The Casio delivers 16,256 levels!

    Only one voice on the keyboard has all of this detail, the concert grand piano. Through my $130 200W Logitech speakers that have a subwoofer and two satellites (keep the satellites resting on top of the PX-150 speakers) the Casio sounds just breathtaking. I can get thunderous fortes and the quietest pianissimos. There is balance throughout the keyboard’s range. Casio’s previous model had a quick decay in the midrange that frustrated me. The PX-150 has detailed expression. I am in love with this keyboard.

    The other pianos and voices? They’re very good. The electric piano is excellent. It has a great Rhodes sound.

    Part of me wishes that I had spent the extra $200 for the PX-350 so that I could have the lines in and the USB flash input. The PX-150 does have a USB to host, and it can be used with some iPad apps. I would recommend that people buy the PX-350, but I was on a budget. And my PX-150 through these Logitechs sounds better than the PX-350 would through its onboard speakers.

    All I can say is that I couldn’t be any happier with the piano feel and the piano sound on this keyboard. It sounds just astounding through my $130 speakers. I can only imagine what it would sound like through an expensive sound system.

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  3. D. Jacoby "DJ"
    33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Worked for a few months then problems began …, December 8, 2013
    By 
    D. Jacoby “DJ” (New York, NY United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    When we first got this we absolutely loved it. Great action, decent sound, felt as good as the 1500 yamaha electronic keyboards. However, after about 6 months, the lowest register black keys began to go out of tune with the white keys, Playing major 3rd’s in the bottom octave became almost painful to listen to.

    Casio repair sent me to the *only* designated repair shop in the new york area – a small shop in 30th street in manhattan. I dropped the keyboard off, and within 20 minutes he called me back and said ‘nothing he could fix. didnt have a calibration setting.’

    I called Casio back, and they were not helpful either. At this point, the dissonance had spread and now the bottom fifteen or so keys were out of tune. I am trying to get Casio to replace the unit, as it seems to not be ‘repairable’ but so far no luck.

    So – not sure if this is a widespread problem, but I would not buy again.

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